Motivational Monday: Famous Failures

Posted: October 29th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: It Hurts So Good, Motivation, Videos, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Famous FailureI know, you’re probably thinking, “How can ‘famous failures’ be motivational?”

It’s simple; because I’ve failed. Miserably. I’m writing a book and at times I just want to take my laptop and through it through the window. I repeatedly set writing goals and miss them.

But you know, I just can’t quit on it. There’s something that burns deep inside me to get the words on the page. I have a message buried in the marrow of my bones, and though it aches when I try to extract it, it must come out.

Our youth pastor Joe Gilchrist preached at church yesterday and shared a list of famous people who appeared to be complete failures before they found their way to success. And I loved it. Not in a morbid way where I said, “Ha! You suck too!” but where I could say, “Wow, they overcame so much more than I have to. With God’s strength, I can do this.”

So I found a video with some of these “famous failures” and I hope it motivates you to keep on keeping on.


Hearers only?

Posted: October 25th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: It Hurts So Good, My Thoughts | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

I listen to a lot of teaching material and sermons at work. Many of these are from YouTube and the video plays in the background while I work (they are not a visible distraction). When I need to get up, I pause them, and I have noticed a trend.

Here are two screen captures that I took of recent YouTube teachings. One is a seminar by Jim Rohn, and incredible personal development guru. The other is a sermon at a church. Can you tell me which photo belongs to which teaching? (I blanked out their eyes for privacy)

If you couldn’t guess, the left picture is the sermon, the right is the seminar. There is a distinct difference in the two. In the sermon picture, the attendees are observing the teaching and committing it to mental memory.

The people attending the seminar are participating and writing down the information so they can go over it again later.

Given the different level of participation in the teachings, which group is more committed to the topic at hand?

Which would you say is the group simply hearing?

Which do you think are more likely act on the information they are receiving not just that day, but weeks, months, or years down the road?

Which are you?

 


Motivational Monday: How Bad Do You Want It?

Posted: October 15th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Motivation, Videos | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

There’s a reason this video has been seen over 11 million times. It’s awesome.

I’m almost finished writing my first draft of my first book. One of the keys to that progress is answering the question, “How bad do I want it?” When you can answer that honestly, you’ll be a giant step closer to accomplishing your dreams.

The narrator is Eric Thomas.

 

 


Motivational Monday: No Arms, No Legs, No Problem

Posted: October 8th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Motivation, Videos | Tags: , , | No Comments »

I saw this video of Nick Vujicic, a guy with no arms or legs and I had to post it here. This guy is incredible. My assumption would be that if I had no arms and legs, life would merely be existing, but this guy is truly living!

He says that our greatest disability can be our mind, and the choices we make.

What’s keeping you from accomplishing your dreams? Make the choice today that nothing will.

 

 


What I Learned From The NFL Replacement Refs

Posted: October 3rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: My Thoughts, Random | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Like it or not, the NFL ruled the last second  touchdown by the Seattle Seahawks against the Green Bay Packers to be the correct call. You didn’t see that in the headlines did you? (story link)

For the first three weeks of the NFL season, it seemed that the games were a side note to the officiating. While some despise the mishaps of the replacement referees in the first three weeks of the NFL season others found that they added an entertaining an unpredictable aspect to the games. Either way, they taught me a few things:

 

1.    Do the best you can, we all make mistakes. The regular refs were on strike and the NFL found what they believed to be the most competent replacements. I’m sure being thrust onto the biggest stage in the world was overwhelming, but they found a way to get the job done.

And sometimes we feel the same. Pressures  mount and stress is added at every point, but just do the best you can. Take what knowledge you have and apply it. Will you always get it right? No. Learn from the mistakes so you don’t repeat them.

2.    Give the other guy the benefit of the doubt. I don’t believe anyone wakes up in the morning, looks in the mirror, and says, “I’m going to be a jerk today and tick off as many people as I can.” Likewise the refs didn’t start each game with the mindset of blowing calls. I need to remember that people on the other side of the aisle from me are trying their best to be great at their work, that the customer has a right to be upset if you messed up, that service reps can have bad days too.

When in doubt, just treat the other guy how you would want to be treated if you messed up: with compassion and understanding.

3.    Don’t make excuses The post-game press conferences were full of players and coaches calling out the missed calls (that went the other teams way). They had a right to be upset, but a bad call is rarely the only reason a team loses a game. There are scores of missed opportunities: a pass that was thrown to hard, a hold on a block that calls back a touchdown, and missed tackles.

Bad things happen that are out of our control. In the end we need to take responsibility for our decisions and let the cards fall where they may. The alternative is repeating failures by blaming others for our missed opportunities.

4.    Even if the world is against you, show up.  I can’t imagine being one of these guys. It seemed every round of games, these they were less popular with the public. Regardless, they showed up. The world rejected them, but they didn’t run, hide, or quit. They clocked in and did what they had to do.

It’s the same for us. Sometimes we aren’t going to win the “Most Popular” award at work or home for the decisions we make, but that doesn’t mean we shrink into a hole. We must stand up and be proud of what we do. Half of the road to success is simply showing up.

What did you learn from the replacement refs?


Motivational Monday: Maybe It’s My Fault

Posted: October 1st, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Motivation, Videos | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments »

Michael Jordan, one of the greatest basketball players of all time, had a great series of commercials awhile back about becoming legendary. Yeah, I think he knows a little about what it takes to be a Hall of Fame player. This one is called, “Maybe it’s My Fault” and has a twist at the end about why we may not become great.

So what’s your excuse?